The Importance Of Reference and Education In Your Getting the Right Job


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Most of you job hunters out there might want to polish your reference and education in your resumes or curriculum vitae so you can up the chances of getting the attention of human resource officers. This is especially true to people who have been unemployed from their jobs due to their companies cutting downsizing.

The number of people who have been re-trenched due to global recession has been rising in an alarming rate. Most of these out of employment people are suddenly put into a situation wherein their source of living is taken away so abruptly that they end up relying on the government monthly checks to survive. Many stories have been heard of these professionals still out of job because some job centers just cannot seem to find the right job for them that can match their skills, experience, and other attributes.

You must know that competition out there is tougher with fresh graduates, young professionals looking for greener pastures, or the laid off middle age worker, and other job seekers flooding the job market. You may be one of the types of job hunters circling the job centers in town, surfing online job databases, and or looking at your community bulletin board or local newspaper. And so you know how it is to keep on searching without having any positive feedback from the companies you have sent your resumes or CV’s. What seems to be the problem?

Well, there are two emerging important factors called reference and education that should be carefully mentioned in your profile or portfolio. Many human resource officers have been keen on these two factors because of the scarcity of the jobs that they can offer. Any of the companies wanting to hire a personnel would want someone who have been working credibly as stated in his references and also has the knowledge to fill in the job position that can be mirrored by his educational attainments. The higher the education, the higher is the expectation for you to get the job well done.

So how do you get a good reference? This depends if you have any prior job experiences and the type of job seeker that you are. For fresh graduates, enlist all your summer jobs and part-time jobs and then pick out something that relates to the position you are currently applying for. For young professionals or laid off worker, consider your most recent company if they have good commendations regarding your work. Some of the companies that laid off workers readily hand out references or recommendations to laid off workers to help them find a new job right away. Send a reference request letter to your direct supervisor of your best work experience and then wait for their letter of recommendation. This factor can be readily checked by the human resource personnel by contacting your stated references so do not attempt to falsify any documents.

For educational factor, this can be a limiting to those who do not have a degree, certifications, or other documented expertise. Universities, community and technical training schools can readily provide you with your scholastic records for your supporting documents. The government is also willing to shoulder your schooling expenses so that you can further your skills or education and therefore get a better job. Just look around for open programs or scholarships that you can use to make yourself more valuable with additional technical skills or higher education.

The job market right now is having a higher demand for jobs than the available jobs being demanded. You do not want to be blacklisted or banned from any company or job center so refrain from tweaking the facts.

Globalization and Education

n this paper I am going to look at the effect globalization has on education whether it is positive or negative. The paper will look at how globalization has given educators the ability to expand their teaching and the learning experience. One of the sources is a follow-up on a conference at Harvard held by many faculty experts in various fields. The article should provide some good insight as to whether or not globalization has proven to be beneficial toward educators and the education they are providing. Globalization is a process in which economies, cultures, and societies have combined through a global network of trade and communication. While the term is more often used in economic settings, globalization has aided in the advancement of society as a whole. Globalization is not a new idea, and when used in its economic connotation, it refers to the removal of trade barriers amongst nations to improve and increase the flow of goods across the world. But in this article, we are going to look at the implications of globalization on education and the educators themselves.

The way globalization has influenced trade barriers and communications among countries has in turn habituated the way educators educate. Corporations have targeted schools and colleges and have turned to them in order to help with expansion. Courses and programs were restructured in order to increase the marketing for programs such as MBAs and distance learning courses. A distance learning course is an online based course that has helped people who may already be working or those who need to stay at home achieve a degree. As a result the cost for students to attend universities has gone up as well, leading to a change in the way loans and grants are distributed and in what quantity. The perception people have on the current economy is playing a major impact in globalization effect on education. Regardless of the higher costs, students are still finding it necessary to stay in school and get as much accreditation as they can before entering the job market. It’s projected that in the next few years enrollment numbers will continue to rise significantly due to the belief that not having a degree in today’s economy is detrimental to success.

The restricted courses are allowing students to prepare for particular jobs as opposed to giving them a general education on a subject. This is described as being a “managerial-based” teaching strategy where students are not only taught the concepts needed for their degree, but in leadership as well. This is something to hardly be opposed too, but the increase in direct costs for students is cause for concern among some people. Some people are looking at this relationship between globalization and education and defining it as a technique the government is using to unitize education across the world. Some people feel the government is doing so because of pressure from “greater powers” to increase the educational well-being of students without receiving any opposition to the changes. The increasing understanding is that globalization is being reflected in an educational agenda that allows for various, and countless, improvements upon the education system that allows the educators themselves to expand on their teaching, and present students with real world situations that require them to “think outside the box”, or outside the realm of their particular field, if you will.

In conclusion, globalization seems to be, overall, a pretty beneficial movement in terms of education, although there are still several obstacles in its way. Harvard economist David Bloom has said that the world’s economies have thrived in globalization, as they all share a deep commitment to the education of young people. But he goes on to say that while these nations have gone on to use globalization to increase their educational prosperity, globalization has further distributed more “wealth to the wealthy” and fewer benefits to the poor. It was suggested at the same Harvard conference that education for pre-college students be more informing as well, and those students should know before going in that, for example, “the state of India’s economy, could very well affect their ability to receive and maintain a job once graduated”. The whole idea is very intriguing, and should continue to be monitored closely as globalization’s impact on education will likely be major, just as it has been for many other aspects of society.

Parents of Aspergers Children, Don’t Be Intimidated by Medical and Educational Professionals

After raising children for sixteen years, I’ve learned to trust my instincts. In fact, one psychologist told me that I have a PhD in my children. In this particular case he was referring to my autistic son, who was five years old at the time.

He said, “You’ve been studying him for five years now. That’s how long it takes some psychologists to earn their PhD. You are an expert on your son. Don’t let anyone tell you different.”

Medical Personnel:

I wish I had this much confidence in myself when my middle son was an infant. I kept taking him in for his well baby check ups and complained about developmental delays. He was months behind his brother for smiling, babbling, crawling, walking, talking, etc.

I was intimidated into not looking for answers for three years by one simple comment from his doctor. “Oh, you had the perfect child first.” When my son was three and a half years old, I ventured to ask my own physician in the same family practice. She administered some developmental tests on the spot. Then she immediately handed me a referral to a children’s developmental clinic.

It turned out I was correct in my concern. My son received the diagnosis of Aspergers Syndrome from this clinic. Fortunately, my son was not adversely affected by the delay in a diagnosis and early interventions.

Educational Professionals:

When I took my son into preschool, the vice principal told me that my son was too young to receive a diagnosis of Aspergers Syndrome. When I requested my son be tested for speech and language disabilities, I was told that he had none. The Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) my son had at the beginning of preschool was withdrawn.

In kindergarten my son came home thirty-eight days in a row having had a wetting accident during class. I thought I had complained to everyone that something was wrong. Maybe I did and maybe I didn’t. All I know is after a meeting between my attorney and specialists and the school board’s vice superintendent, attorney and the school’s principal, my son was immediately moved to a different classroom and teacher. The wetting accidents stopped.

There was a discrepancy between the quality of work he was bringing home and what he was doing at home. I felt my son had a learning disability. The school did not. I went to the local learning disability advocates who confirmed that the school did not have to do anything more for my child. I hired an attorney and educational consultant who affirmed my position.

In the end, I did not continue with the services of the hired professionals. Once I had begun to trust in my own instincts, I began advocating on my own for my son. Eventually we did receive a new IEP for my son. He went from a child in the top two thirds of his class to earning straight ‘A’ report cards and being placed in the Honors program